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malformalady:

Dendrobium spectabile
Photo credit: Ricardo in PR

malformalady:

Dendrobium spectabile

Photo credit: Ricardo in PR

Black women artists are here, we exist and we exist positively despite the racial, sexual and class oppressions which we suffer. However, we must first point out the way in which these oppressions have operated in a wider context - not just the art world, but also in the struggles for Black and female liberation.
Chila Kumari Burman, ‘There Have Always Been Great Black Women Artists,’ in Charting the Journey: Writings by Black and Third World Writers, 1988 (via blackcontemporaryart)

(via black-culture)

(Source: malformalady)

goodcharlotteofficial:

redbloodedamerica:

mallninjacode:

pual1010:

brownglucose:

stunningpicture:

So proud of my mother for doing her own research after I sent her that meme. A sign she hung in her car window.

Stay woke

Is this true?

Not only is it true, it gets worse. The Susan G Komen For The Cure Foundation has actually successfully sued “competing” charities, because (paraphrasing) their “message or branding was infringing.”
You read that correctly: they took money that people had donated to cure cancer, and hired attorneys with it, to sue ANOTHER group of people trying to find a cure for cancer, who, in turn, had to use their donated money to hire their own legal counsel to defend themselves.



There’s a documentary about this on Netflix called Pink Ribbons, Inc. if anyone’s interested.

goodcharlotteofficial:

redbloodedamerica:

mallninjacode:

pual1010:

brownglucose:

stunningpicture:

So proud of my mother for doing her own research after I sent her that meme. A sign she hung in her car window.

Stay woke

Is this true?

Not only is it true, it gets worse. The Susan G Komen For The Cure Foundation has actually successfully sued “competing” charities, because (paraphrasing) their “message or branding was infringing.”

You read that correctly: they took money that people had donated to cure cancer, and hired attorneys with it, to sue ANOTHER group of people trying to find a cure for cancer, who, in turn, had to use their donated money to hire their own legal counsel to defend themselves.

There’s a documentary about this on Netflix called Pink Ribbons, Inc. if anyone’s interested.

(via black-culture)

heytheresweets:

Göbekli Tepe, Turkey

"The Birth of Religion: We used to think agriculture gave rise to cities and later to writing, art, and religion. Now the world’s oldest temple suggests the urge to worship sparked civilization." (great photos) - http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/06/gobekli-tepe/mann-text

"Gobekli Tepe: The World’s First Temple?" (or the earliest one we’ve found?… seems likely the first was on African continent…) - http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/gobekli-tepe.html#

"Astronomical Alignments at Gobekli Tepe?" - http://www.dailygrail.com/Sacred-Sites/2013/8/Astronomical-Alignments-Gobekli-Tepe

(via iseesigils)

allblack-everythang:

lainaluvz:

throughkaleidscopeeyes:

AMAZING.

EARTH WIND & FIRE ALBUM WORK + MUSIC is just too relevant,  they they were awake, simply beyond the world. i want all these on vinyl NOW

lluvz

Dat symbolism!

(Source: misskimari, via black-culture)

blackfashion:

Photographer : @Sheepishnarco
Model: @nattygyallee
Tampa, FL

blackfashion:

Photographer : @Sheepishnarco

Model: @nattygyallee

Tampa, FL

wakeupslaves:

☆Bass Reeves☆  former US. slave overcomes white people to become a US Marshal, capturing and locking up over 3000 white criminals in his career before retiring unscaved

by Art T. Burton
(1838-January 12, 1910)

Bass Reeves

During the late 19th Century no area in the United States was a haven and a refuge for criminals like the Indian Territory, pre–statehood Oklahoma. The jurisdiction of this territory fell to the United States court for Western Arkansas, located at Fort Smith, Arkansas. Fort Smith, a frontier town, was located on the eastern border of the Indian Territory. The court was the largest federal court in United States history covering over 75,000 square miles. In 1875, Judge Isaac C. Parker, was given the task of cleaning up the territory by President Ulysses Grant. It would not be an easy task. Parker authorized the hiring of 200 deputy U.S. marshals to sweep over the territory and arrest felons and fugitives. The Fort Smith federal court never hired that many deputies to work, there were usually between twenty and thirty deputies at any one time.

The Indian Territory was originally the domain of the Five Civilized Tribes, Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Creek and Seminole. Due to the fact that some of the Indians fought for the Confederacy during the Civil War, the western portion of the territory was taken away and set aside as reservation space for Plains Indians. The Five Tribes had their own governments, courts, and police, but could not arrest white or black men who were not citizens of the tribes. This task fell to the deputy U.S. marshals who worked out of Fort Smith. Also, the deputies were responsible for arresting Indians who committed crimes against white or black men.

One of the first of the deputies hired by Judge Parker’s court was a former slave from Texas named Bass Reeves. It is believed that Reeves fought in the Indian Territory during the Civil War with the Union Indian brigades. Reeves was known as an expert with pistol and rifle, stood about six foot, two inches, weighed 180 pounds, and was said to have superhuman strength. Reeves had a reputation throughout the territory for his ability to catch outlaws that other deputies couldn’t. He was known to work in disguise in order to get information and affect the arrest of fugitives he wanted to capture.

Reeves was involved in numerous shootouts but was never wounded. He stated that he killed fourteen men in self defense, at the time of his death newspapers reported that he had killed over twenty men. In 1901, Reeves was interviewed by a Territorial newspaper, at that time he stated he had arrested over 3000 men and women who had broke federal laws in the Indian Territory. The Indian Territory, later to include the Oklahoma Territory, in 1890, was the most dangerous area for federal peace officers in the Old West. More than one hundred and twenty lost their lives before Oklahoma became a state in 1907. Bass Reeves escaped numerous assassination attempts on his life, he was the most feared deputy U.S. marshal to work the Indian Territory.

Reeves according to research is the only deputy on record who started working for Parker’s court in 1875 and worked up to statehood in 1907. Bass Reeves worked a total of thirty–two years as a deputy U.S. marshal in the Indian Territory.

Being a former slave, Reeves was illiterate. He would memorize his warrants and writs. In those thirty–two years it is said he never arrested the wrong person due to the fact he couldn’t read.

On one occasion, Reeves son, Bennie committed a domestic murder against his wife. Bass took the warrant and bought his son in for murder shortly thereafter his son convicted and sent to Leavenworth.

At the age of 67, Bass Reeves retired from federal service at Oklahoma statehood in 1907. He was hired as a city policeman in Muskogee, Oklahoma, where he served for about two years. Reeves had a beat in downtown Muskogee, during that time it is reported there was not one crime reported on his beat. It was told by residents that Reeves while walking his beat he would have a sidekick who carried a satchel of pistols.

African American deputy U.S. Marshals who worked the Indian Territory had the authority to arrest whites, blacks or Indians who broke federal laws. This was a very unique reality for black men given the Jim Crow laws of the U.S. after the end of Reconstruction in 1877. On one occasion Bass Reeves was given the warrant for Belle Starr, it was the one time she turned herself in at the Fort Smith Federal Court. Bass Reeves was a legend in his own time. He was the epitome of dedication to duty, Judge Parker’s most trusted deputy and one of the greatest lawmen of the western frontier. On January 12, 1910, Bass Reeves died at the age of 71, in Muskogee, Oklahoma.

Did You Know?

The Choctaw, Chickasaw, Cherokee, (Muscogee) Creek and Seminole Indian tribes were forcibly moved to Indian Territory on what became known as the Trail of Tears. The Arkansas River served as a water route to Fort Smith where they received supplies before crossing the river into Indian Territory.

(via black-culture)

talisman:

 

-teesa-:

How is this still a thing?

(via headwrapandcamera)

micdotcom:

7 ways white people can combat their privilege

It’s important for everyone to begin thinking and behaving in ways that relinquish white privilege and white supremacy when it noticeably impacts daily life. Because it’s not about admitting it anymore. It’s about giving it up. Here’s a few ways how that can happen.

What you can do in public | Follow micdotcom 

(via headwrapandcamera)

The flower doesn’t dream of the bee. It blossoms and the bee comes.
Mark Nepo, The Book of Awakening (via talisman)

(Source: seulray, via talisman)